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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)
works for city governments. gordon feller, michael littlejohn and you have heard from carla. it is very hard to moderate. all i want to do is tweet. i wanted to start with a question that really build off presentation. this can be a very broad conversation. we are talking about efficiency and how we manage congestion and lower energies. we are talking about the integration of data. we are talking about participation was social media, co-production of solution. david mentioned this. the united states is not quite at the vanguard of this. when i think it can just in, i think about singapore. he brought the copenhagen. i want to start with the ibm and cisco part of the world appeared word you see progress within cities? where is the u.s. -- part of the world. where do you see progress within cities? where in the u.s.? >> we can point to smarter transportation and public safety and health care. that is not necessarily a smarter city. as marchers city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, -- a smarter city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, is a city of t
financial company and to complete the government at divestiture the idea would be that the enterprise could be recapitalized by creditors and the financial company receiving a combination of cash, equity or debt in satisfaction of the claims against the receivership. the strategy has the advantage of returning the company to private ownership and insurers as possible avoiding an even bigger too big to fail company. it also would likely promote the stability in the financial markets of the mandates. a few words about international cooperation because that's certainly been a big issue in connection with how we going to do this? there is a lot of work done. certainly in the recent financial crisis that has been increased awareness on the degree to which these large financial companies operate across the borders. and so, obviously the resolution has to be coordinated internationally to reduce the risk of disruption. so, there is no current international insolvency framework to resolve a global the systemically important financial institution in a comprehensive manner so we really need to do adv
that it is going to the israel government. >> you're calling us from missouri. in a little while we look good to the missouri senate race debate. that is a debate between clearly paschal -- claire macaskill and tod akin. what they're using is the big issues in that race? caller: a lot people are mad. they think that we can do better with our government, like rummy promises. -- like to make money promises. yes been in business. he knows how to make it work. i completing to the american people that they get him a chance. i have had a full-time job in a part-time job trying to make it as a single mother. also, it is a feeling in faith. host: how is it influence your vote in the senate race? caller: i'm going to go republican. that is the way i am feeling. you know,. host: here to give us more insight is it politics reporter at the st. louis post dispatch. thank you for joining us. give us a sense of what is going on in missouri. this has been very intense. guest: the race has tightened. clear and taught a again have been hiding for a month now. after he won he made a very controversial comment t
is that i spent 25 years working for the federal government in a lot of agencies. those agencies comprise 40% of our discretionary budget. the misapplication of resources going on in our federal government should be stopped. they should be listening to the constituents. thank you very much. >> thank you. i am running for the united states senate because i want to make a difference. i believe america needs a new generation of leadership. what is wrong with america is extreme politics and extreme wealth. my opponent to represent the status quo. charlie summer's represents extreme politics and angus king represents extreme wealth. what i am offering the state of maine is someone who is not beholden to outside interests. we need a new generation of leadership. i hope to have your support. >> my name is andrew ian dodge. i am in this race because i believe the issues of liberty, freedom, and individual rights are being trampled on left and right, whether it is a resting -- arresting a farmer for selling raw milk. i have a touch of ethnicity about me and i am the youngest in the race. i hope we ha
, i have two foundations. one in africa where we work along side the governments of africa to deliver change to the people in seven different african countries. called the big footprint and then an organization of religious and cultural exchange where we work in some of the most difficult countries in the world where people are educated in the way they think and look at each other. >> gavin: you're not just bringing in resources you're using your own human resource to get involved, hands on, i imagine. >> i raise money for my foundation. i gave my own money to them and i go out to 20 different countries. it's a political after life. not for you governor, yet at any rate. >> gavin: great to see you. >> yes, thank you. >> gavin: thank you. >> gavin: understandably you might think it a bit of a stretch to segue from former head of state to a supermodel, but petra nemcova's story is worth your time. she was injured in thailand when the 2004 tsunami hit. her fiancÉ was tragically killed but petra survived, and it was a life-changing experience. she started the "happy hearts foundation." >
on it now i will do nothing. that will be protected. that's between the government and the them. that's protected. but all i had some plans that will save it for the long haul and i will end at that. you're very gracious with time. smith: de leggitt rebuttal time? >> moderator: how much you need? how about 15 seconds. smith: the most radical proposals in the congress and the senate any way that a grand total of 16 votes was the so-called rand paul plan. the rhine and budget has all kind of problems because when it comes to medicare, this is a basic debate about ending the medicare guaranteed benefit preserving my record indicates not just preserving but strengthen. >> moderator: monica ag you have the last question. >> because of the economic downturn, the education in our country has had to squeeze from every angle, city budgets for education have dropped, state budgets have dropped, so it makes it challenging most experts would say to believe our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field with other students around the world because the bigger class size is no
government and newspapers, without one or the other, he would have preferred to do with newspapers and without government. then he got elected and began to claim he was misquoted. from that, zocalo said big questions may lot of different perspectives. we have re-different people here -- three people here from different parts of the country, different backgrounds. they're all journalists. they are all people who have looked at a wide variety of topics in their work, and have among the topics they have looked at, are the media itself and specifically questions about how we keep a check on power, keep a check on government. you will hear from all three of them. i will introduce each of them as i ask the questions. immediately to my right is bernardo ruiz. his most recent film "reportero," is an incredible film if you have not seen it, it follows a reporter at an embattled mexican news weekly reporting on organized crime and corrupt officials. the film was completed and toward mexico and the human rights watch film festival and will air january 7, 2013 on pbs. he also produced two docu
to see them spending more time letting people know about other things going on in the government and have been mentioned. the activities that they talk about are not necessarily all the things we should be concerned about. there's hardly any mention made about the comments joe biden made to the man who came to pick up the body of his son. i don't know that these are the kind people that we should ever presented last but no one will touch these issues. guest: if nobody touched those issues, you would not know about it. there's no shortage of information these days. these campaigns are being covered like never before and you can get a lot of the daily horse race aspect, but there's plenty of coverage of what the candidates are saying of the campaign trail and how that equates to the previous statements, policies they have enacted. i think that there is plenty of information for people. they just have to be willing to sit down and find it. host: here is "the bloomberg insider" take on colorado put out on august 27th. can you explain? guest: in our last legislative session, for the third time
think that there is going to be a mentality to get the government spending any money at all because -- i would agree to this point if there is not enough money i think we could drive more efficient cars and we could change the power plants but if there isn't a profit of changing to natural gas, companies won't do it. they are not going to lose money to change their power plant over to natural gas. the afton de subsidize. i think it is a sad day because america needs to admit climate change is real and we don't have the money to fix it. i don't have the answer for you but it's ignorant to ignore it. >> host: that's john of the mexico. the presidential candidates were sidelined on the storm from campaigning six days ago before next tuesday's election and here is the headline on the "the washington times" romney balances sympathy and politics to raise donations here's what he had to say about the rally yesterday. i proceed affect people in dayton got up this morning, some went to the grocery store and purchased some things that these families will need, and i appreciate your generosity. it'
want to see how your government works directly, c- span is about the only place to go. >> he watches c-span on comcast. c-span, treated by america's cable companies' in 1979 and brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> joe biden posted she economic advisor jared bernstein and murray took part in a debate hosted by the tariff board school of public policy. this is about one hour and 20 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. in 1962, 50 years ago, mike published "poverty in the united states." at the time the american economy was in the golden age of economic prosperity. a rising tide was lifting all boats. the economy had grown rapidly. the wages of most workers have been growing faster than the rate of theinflation. almost no one talked about poverty. book not only change the discourse but the public policy landscape. he wrote "there is a familiar america that has the highest standard of living the world has ever known. that is not change the fact that tens of millions of americans are at this very moment existing at levels of been need those necessary for human de
areas of the government. >> senator, you talked about the fiscal cliff that is looming at the end of december. we have tax cuts that are about to expire, many of them, and we also have, like you were just talking about the trillion sequester cuts. all these things are happening by the end of the year. what do you think congress should do, do you feel like they should leave everything as is? or do you think, do you have any ideas that congress should put in place that you will put forward when you guys go back in next week? >> yeah, i think that the best way to talk about the tax rates is they're what we've had for 10 years. businesses have made their plans predicated on a tax rate. i don't think we should increase the tax rates on anybody. i don't care if you're rich, middle class or poor. we shouldn't divide up people. we should divide people into two sectors. private sector, public sector. i don't want to grow the public sector, i want to grow the private sector. so that means means, leaving as much money in the private sector as possible. i don't want to tax anybody any more to
in better shape than its peers because of the actions of its government. perhaps the most important cause of america's relative health is the federal reserve. ben bernanke understood the depths of the problem early and responded energetically and creatively. the clearest vindication of his actions has been that the european central bank after charting an opposite course for three years with disastrous results, has now adopted policies similar to the fed's, and thus avoided a potential lehman-like clapgz in europe. the leading experts on financial crises argue that the united states is performing better than most countries in similar circumstances in history. consumers are paying down debt, and consumer confidence is at its highest levels since september, 2007. every american recovery since world war ii has been led by housing except this one. but finally, housing is back. two weeks ago, jamie dimon, chief executive of jpmorgan chase, declared that housing had turned the corner and predicted that as a consequence, economic growth in 2013 would be so strong that the fed would have to raise
and local governments has been outstanding. obviously we are now moving into the recovery phase and a lot of the most severely- affected areas. new jersey, new york have been pounded by this storm. connecticut has taken a big hit. because of some of the work done ahead of time, we have been able to get over 1000 officials in place. we have been able to get supplies, food, medicine, water and emergency generators to ensure hospitals and law enforcement offices are able to stay up and running as their of their responding. we will continue to push as hard as we can to make sure power is up throughout the region, and obviously this is mostly a local responsibility, and the private utilities are going to have to lean forward, but we're doing everything we can to provide additional resources so that we can expedite getting power up and running in many of the communities. there are places around newark, new jersey, where you have 80 percent of the people without power. my instruction has been do not figure out why we cannot do something. i want to figure out how we do something. i want you to cu
. that individuals create jobs not government that creates jobs. [applause] when mitt romney is president he is going to need another united states senator, republican senator from florida. [applause] how many here have already voted? [applause] and for those of you who wake up tomorrow morning and go vote. after you vote for mitt romney go down the ballot a little more and vote for connie mack. can you do that? there are dig differences between senator nelson and myself. he was the deciding vote for obamacare. i voted against obamacare. [applause] senator nelson has voted for higher taxes 272 times. i voted to cut taxes. [applause] senator nelson voted to gut our military. i voted to strengthen our 34il8 tear. military [applause] a couple of things happen when i beat senator nelson. the second thing that happens is harry reid will no longer control the agenda. [applause] so florida, we're counting on you, we're counting on you to get out there and vote for mitt romney. i'm counting on you to go out and vote for me. together we'll make sure that mitt romney is the next president, that i'm the next se
't based on the inalienable right to life, liberty and pursuit of happiness and self-government but the essence of revolution is you have to win. nobody hands you victory in revolution. that is what the war was about but then the war ends and the south has to be reintegrated into the union. but there are all these unreconstructed confederates who still believed they had the better part of the argument and the white race should be supreme in the south, who resent entirely the fact that abolition was imposed on the south but whereas during the civil war they didn't have a vote, didn't have a say and the national government, all of a sudden they do. during war, the rules of democracy were suspended. democracy is based on majority rule. once the war ends democracy kicks back in and so the south has to be reintegrated politically and when grant was nominated for president in 1868 grant was first of all nominee by acclamation of the republican party. grant did not lift a finger on his own behalf. allowed himself to be nominated and allowed himself to be elected. one thing, he didn't g
a uniform standard governing conduct of investment advisers or broker dealers and to develop a comprehensive regulatory regime for over-the-counter derivatives among many other things. today is like to focus on a few specific provisions of the act, tying back to fundamentals and mentioned a moment ago in hopes that should the students who are with us today ever put your impressive educations to use as public servant, you will look back -- you look at potential regulation and just display. so let me start with title vii of dodd-frank, part of the active for the first time creates a comprehensive regulatory regime for the over-the-counter toronto-based market. title vii illustrates the importance of financial fundamentals on a vast scale, addressing nature of this market with a global notional value of some $650 trillion. derivatives are financial products and derive their value from some underlying theme and one common type of derivative is a swap, which is the financial contract in which two counterparties agree to exchange or sloppiness with each other as a result of things such as changes
is to get the government -- the overt regulation is crushing our economy. those are the facts. we have to have clean air, clean water. at the same time, when you have the federal government telling the american farmer that your 17-year-old daughter cannot drive a tractor, who will take better care of the farm kid? mom and dad or big government? the key thing is to have both parties coming together sharing ideas. not one party telling us what we cannot do. let's look at everything and do it in a responsible way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor
.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular t
of of the prosperity to virginia. when they talk about less government and tax cuts, this isit looks like enormous cuts toyou can't have it both ways. they don't want to have any revenues to balance the books and what substantial cuts to government spending, that is what looks like in the commonwealth of virginia. when you make the draconian cuts thousands of lost jobs. they estimate 200,000 jobs just we may agree on the issues but we certainly disagree on how to get there. is turnout. i say that because in 2008 we had 75% turnout in virginia. three out of four voted. it is terrific. we want that type of turnout, democrats, republicans, and independents to engage in democracy. here in loudoun, it was over 75% turnout. over 70 percent -- 77% to thousand eight and barack obama received 54% of the vote. what it means to us as we are doing everything we can to get out the vote. we have five days left. we're working on it for weeks, if not months. we have tremendous resources in as well. loudoun and the rest of the commonwealth. i think we have a superior ground game, a superior and help re-elect the presid
rehearsed emergency response protocols by many institutions and government. there is a collective sense of denial too about how poorly presented the city is for events of this scale. how poorly prepared have we been, steve? >> well, very, especially about flood waters. irene, tropical storm irene was only six months ago and the water, you remember, washed right up to the top of the battery but didn't come over. it wasn't hard to image then what a surge of ten or 11 or 12 feet higher might have done. and yet, it seems, and we'll have time to sort all of this south when we get through this emergency, that vy little was done to protect underground infrastructure from a very predictable surge. first of all. second of all, the extent to which the transportation and power system were vulnerable to this kind of weather, was known for ten years, predicted. again it's not clear that either in the private sector or the public sector, the city was illingo iest in what are frankly very large sums necessary to prevent this kind of disruption. >> rose: let me turn to you, paul. in your piece i think
than any federal agent in the history of the government's over a 30 year career and i am happy to share those experiences because they are unique because i was the only federal agent who experienced being smuggled from mexico to the interior of the united states, going through travels by myself in the back of the trunk of a car, things of that nature. it was quite dramatic but something i did with a lot of pride because i felt going after those seeking a better life in the united states i share those stories with you in my book the shadow catcher. >> there are many powerful moments you describe. i am wondering if you could share a couple of those with us. in particular, a juncture where you are actually stopped by the u.s. border patrol as you enter and you are in an operation. >> that was one of many dramatic moments, i was the new mexico state trooper. you will see the picture in my book, i had a big afro and long hair and when i was a federal agent, picked me up. quite dramatic and had been under cover by myself in mexico. i had been in a small hotel in mexico that was fully invested
. to the one who governs seas and quells the storms, we thank you for offering each life and granting hope in times of calamity. we come to you on the eve of this election seeking wisdom. for failing to take up the calls of the fatherless, we ask for mercy. for insufficiently defending the case of the widow, we humbly repent. teach us to fear you and keep your commandments. may we learn to do good, seek justice, and rebuke those who would oppress your children. restore our rulers as at the first, and our judges as at the beginning. that we might be called a nation of righteousness, of faithful people. may we be redeemed by justice and those repent by righteousness. let the retched poor, pitiful, naked, and blind experience the transformation of your grace so that your name, o lord, might be exalted among the nations. amen. the speaker pro tempore: thank you, chaplain. pursuant to section 3-a of the house resolution 788, the journal of the last day's proceedings is approved. the chair will lead the house in the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of am
advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself around the world? what does that mean to us as we look at the future of conflict? the operational environment of conflict is changing but in my mind the fundamental nature of war remains the same and that is the struggle to influence populations in governance. that has not changed. so it's how we continue to understand that struggle within the new operational environment and the context we see it. the army was created 237 years go to defend this great nation insecure abroad and in my opinion that appear -- imperative does not change so the one thing i tell everyone you said we are starting from a position of strength and why do i say that? because in the army specifically we have the most combat tested, combat ready experience force we
message to everyone involved is that we have to take this seriously. the federal government is working effectively with state and local governments. it will be very important that populations in the impacted states take this seriously, listen to your state and local officials. my message to the governors and mayors is that anything they need, we will do it. we will cut through red tape and not get bogged down in a lot of rules. you want to make sure that we are leaning forward into making sure we have the best possible response into what is going to be a big and messy system. crag, which like to add something? >> as the president says, it will come down to achieving those evacuation orders and taking protective measures. get information on how to protect yourself and your families. also, check on your neighbors. this will be a big storm and we need to be there for each other. >> ready.gov, for the general public, if you need to know where to respond, that is where you get that information. but greg is exactly right. what we do in times like this is all together and help each other. the
they saw were homes destroyed and streets still under water. president obama promised the government would do whatever it can to help storm victims. >> we'll follow up to make sure you get all the help you need until you rebuild. >> reporter: not far away the search for traps or missing people on staten island continued. nypd rescued six people from roof troops on wednesday. there are signs of life is returning to normal in new york city. all three airports are open as of today as is the new york stock exchange and broadway shows. problems still persist. traffic in the city is nothing short of a nightmare without public transportation wednesday manhattan streets were clogged with people trying to get back to work. there's some good news. subway and train service is starting up again today at least on a limited basis. >> i am declaring a transportation emergency. >> reporter: mayor bloomberg is mandating that all cars driving into manhattan has to have at least three people. >> i know it is inconvenient for a lot of people but the streets can only handle so much. >> reporter: half of all ga
report is coming out on friday, that has been confirmed. the big government jobs report. scott, the last one before the election. >> that could have a big impact. but there's another thing we haven't really thought about here, wednesday is end of month. you can't keep these things shut for that long. we have end of month and jobs report. we will have to start getting things back on-line very soon. sandra: what do traders want to see ultimately the exchange do as far as trading is concerned? >> we would like to be open. it is also a good advertisement for open outcry, we're standing out here with these funny color jackets on but we want to make sure the public knows we're here and open for business. sandra: that's it. energy is still trading on the globe-ex electronically. only 45 minute break between 5:15 and 6:00 p.m. eastern time, that's still plan as scheduled. trading will begin in energy and gold market tonight. that is if the cme doesn't change things between now and then. we will keep everybody updated on that. liz: thank you very much. neil cavuto will have those globe-ex trades
getting enough information from local government about what they can expect and when? do people feel well informed? >> i think they do. i mean those who are able to get t receiving it is a problem, there has been no shortage of briefings by the mayor, governor cuomo, governor christie, utility company executives. they are doing lots of outreach but most of the news isn't that good if you are without power. so i don't know how much it makes people feel better. >> suarez: patrick mcgeehan from "the new york times", thanks for joining us. >> sure, thank you. >> brown: hurricane sandy also devastated parts of the caribbean, including haiti, where 54 people died. special correspondent fred de sam lazaro filed a dispatch and photos from port au prince. those are on our "world" page. >> woodruff: and we turn now to syria. the newshour sent freelance video journalist toby muse there recently to see how civilians are faring. as margaret warner reports, many have become targets in the country's civil war. a warning-- some images may be disturbing. >> warner: within the walls of a secret school in n
government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and his half-brother and almost looked like the same person, you took the same person and bit him in caramel. that was astounding to me. i don't know if the similarities were that profound throughout but that seemed to me -- anyone who saw the picture and that is why you selected those photographs, i would like to hear about that in terms of the true similarities and i would love to hear any comments you would care to share when families got together for the unveiling and two sides of the family together to describe in appropriate ways the interaction between them. >> the families do fin
, to big an economy. the government can effect the direction of developments not the degree. >> the medication isn't that much stronger. i mean, you rule out protectionism, trade wars with china that kind of stuff which a lot of people reach to as a cure what's in the disease. >> yes. >> you're obviously strongly in favor of a marshall plan for middle class skills. community colleges. >> absolutely. and i think we can do some pretty radical things in education and training. you know, i don't see why education should be -- should cost -- why higher education should cost any american more than a nominal amount. i think that we can give tuition-free scholarships to everyone who attends public schools, public universities. and we have great public universities in america. and it would be a matter of rechanneling the student aid we now provide into this. and it would take it away from the private universities. i am saying look i'm a product of private universities but as a matter of public policy the distribution of money between the private and public sector in education i think
. government is one -- you started in government. you were the inspector general of health and human services. the legislative leadership in california hired a bunch of journalists out of the press corps to put them in office -- they figure out stories that have not gotten a lot of attention. there are reporters working in l.a. county for the board of supervisors -- they have journalistic blogs or even internally. does that have value? can the government be doing this? can you be doing journalism from government? >> no. i do not think you can be doing government from in -- journalism from in government. the inspector general is supposed to be a -- apolitical, and that was not totally the case, to be totally frank. i do not know what it is like now, but when i worked there during the clinton administration it was absolutely not apolitical. people make decisions about what it will find, what you will do. i was told that during the bush administration the oig would write reports. that are be completely redlined and turned into a one page memo if it did not fall on certain lines. so i do not thi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 84 (some duplicates have been removed)

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